How To Detect a Leak

The best way too determine if you have a leak in your plumbing system, is by first checking your water meter. If you are not familiar with reading water meters, please read How to Read Your Water Meter before continuing.

Make sure no water is running.

Locate your water meter and check the leak indicator to see if it moving. Depending on the brand of your meter, the leak indicator could be a small triangular shaped dial or a small silver wheel that rotates when water in flowing through the meter. If the dial is moving, chances are, you have a leak.

 

STEP 1:
Make sure no water is running.

STEP 2:
Locate your water meter and check the leak indicator (tattle tale) to see if it moving. Depending on the brand of your meter, the leak indicator could be a small triangular shaped dial or a small silver wheel that rotates when water in flowing through the meter. If the dial is moving, chances are, you have a leak.
ORSTEP 2:
Read your water meter. Write down the current reading, including tenths of a cubic foot or mark your meter with a felt pen over the needle.
STEP 3:
Read the meter again after 10 to 15 minutes. If the meter reading has changed, or the needle has moved, you may have a leak.
WATER LOSS:
Common Water Loss Examples:
Leaking Toilet @1/2 GPM = 21,600 Gal/mo
Drip Irrigation @1 GPM = 43,200 Gal/mo
Watering Garden for 2 hours @ 5 GPM = 18,000 Gal/mo
Watering Garden for 2 hours @ 10 GPM = 36,000 Gal/mo
Unattended Water Hose 1 night @10 GPM = 5,400 Gal/mo
Broken Services Line 1 night @15 GPM = 8,100 Gal
1 day @15 GPM = 21,600 Gal
1 week @15 GPM = 151,200 Gal
1 month @ 15 GPM = 648,000 Gal
Stuck Ice Maker @ 2 GPM = 86,400 Gal/mo
Stuck Check Valve in Washing Machine – 30 minutes = 240 Gal


Typical Normal Water Use:
1 Bath = 42 Gal
1 Shower = 17 Gal
Wash 1 Load of Clothes = 45 Gal (Older Models)
Wash 1 Load of Clothes = 25 Gal (High Efficiency Models)
Flush Toilet = 3 Gal